IJMEG Copyright © 2010-present. All rights reserved. Published by e-Century Publishing Corporation, Madison, WI 53711
Int J Mol Epidemiol Genet 2011;2(4):354-366

Original Article
Interaction between IGF-1 polymorphisms and overweight for the risk of
pancreatic cancer in Japanese

Makoto Nakao, Satoyo Hosono, Hidemi Ito, Miki Watanabe, Nobumasa Mizuno, Yasushi Yatabe, Kenji Yamao, Ryuzo Ueda,
Kazuo Tajima, Hideo Tanaka, and Keitaro Matsuo

Division of Epidemiology and Prevention, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, 1-1 Kanokoden, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi
464-8681, Japan; Department of Medical Oncology and Immunology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical
Science, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 467-8601, Japan; Department of Epidemiology, Nagoya University
Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8550, Japan; Department of Gastroenterology,
Aichi Cancer Center Central Hospital, 1-1 Kanokoden, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8681, Japan; Department of Pathology
and Molecular Diagnostics, Aichi Cancer Center Central Hospital, 1-1 Kanokoden, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8681, Japan.

Received September 19, 2011; accepted November 8, 2011; Epub November 25, 2011; Published December 15, 2011

Abstract: Although several reports have described a possible association between insulin-like growth factors-1 (IGF-1) and
pancreatic cancer (PC) risk, this association has not been evaluated in the non-Caucasian population. To assess the impact of
IGF-1 polymorphisms on PC risk in Japanese, we conducted a case-control study which compared the frequency of ten single
nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes of IGF-1. SNPs were investigated using the TaqMan method in 176 patients
with PC and 1402 control subjects. Exposure to risk factors was assessed from the results of a self-administered
questionnaire. Associations and gene-environment interactions were examined using an unconditional logistic regression
model. We did not observe any significant main effect of IGF-1 loci, but did find interactions between rs5742714 and past
and/or current body-mass index (BMI) status. Among patients with BMI ≥ 25 at age 20, an increased PC risk was observed with
the addition of the minor allele for rs5742714 (trend P = 0.048) and rs6214 (P = 0.043). Among patients with current BMI ≥ 25,
an increased or decreased PC risk was observed with the addition of the minor allele for rs5742714 (trend P = 0.046),
rs4764887 (P = 0.031) and rs5742612 (P = 0.038). Haplotype analysis of IGF-1 showed a significant association among
patients who were either or both previously or currently overweight. These findings suggest that IGF-1 polymorphisms may
affect the development of PC in the Japanese population in combination with obesity. Further studies to confirm these findings
are warranted. (IJMEG1109001).

Key words: Pancreatic cancer, SNPs, IGF-1, overweight, risk factor

Full Text  PDF

Address all correspondence to:
Dr. Keitaro Matsuo
Division of Epidemiology and Prevention
Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute
1-1 Kanokoden, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya
464-8681, Japan.
Tel: +81 52 762 6111 ext. 7013
Fax: +81 52 763 5233
Email: kmatsuo@aichi-cc.jp